Skip to main content

Teen SRC 2021 – All This Time by Mikki Daughtry

I’m not much of a romance reader. I’m more of the “fantasy, horror, and phycological thriller mix that keeps you awake past midnight thinking about the book” kind of person. But, you know, I saw this book at the library and I give full credit to the cover art, because if it hadn’t been that darn elegant, I probably wouldn’t have picked the book up in the first place. So, All This Time is a fiction romance novel by Mikki Daughtry and Rachael Lippincott, that sends you on a whole whirlpool of emotions.

When Kyle’s girlfriend dies in a car crash, he can’t find the motivation to do anything. Kyle blames himself for Kimberly’s death, and it seems that everything around him is a constant reminder of the nagging pain over his loss. And then he meets Marley – a girl who’s suffered from her own loss – and Kyle slowly starts recovering, his life becoming more whole than it ever had been. There’s a problem, though. Does Kyle really like Marley as “just a friend?” And even though Marley’s all sunshine and rainbows on the outside, that doesn’t mean she’s completely healed from her loss…

Can I just say…I don’t re-read books. Unless I’m bored out of my mind, I rarely read books again. Why? Well, there’s plenty of new books out there that I want to read, and I wouldn’t want to spend my time reading the same plot that i’ve already read instead. And anyway, not a lot of books are interesting enough to re-read anyway. Or so I thought. I must’ve re-read this book around…four times?! I even returned it, and then borrowed it again from the library just to read it a second time. THAT’S how good it is. The plot twists are truly amazing, and completely unpredictable. You become so, so attached to the characters, so when you read about them, you actually feel something for Kyle and Marley. All This Time describes emotions in the most precise way possible, and even for me, a black-hearted “sadist” who likes to read about murders, this book was heartbreaking.

(sadist/saddest? get it?! worst pun ever, I know, but I have no sense of humour… so there you are.)

This is definitely my favourite romance book. Yeah, I mean, it’s true that I’ve only read like two romance books in my life, but I have a feeling this one’s going to stay at the top for quite the while. Are all romance books this good?! Hopefully not, otherwise my favourite “fantasy, horror, and phycological thriller mix that keeps you awake past midnight thinking about the book” thing might possibly get bumped down to second-favourite genre. 10/10 for All This Time with no hesitation!

Teen SRC 2020- We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars

Having read Genuine Fraud (also by E. Lockhart) I started We Were Liars happily expecting to have my socks knocked off. And it certainly didn’t disappoint.

Welcome to the Sinclair family. Tall, proud, and rich. Golden-haired, freckled, and most importantly: perfect. There are no Sinclair addicts, drop-outs, or failures. And every summer, the prestigious family meets on their very own island. But one summer, when the Liars (Cadence, her cousins, and a family friend named Gat) are fifteen, something goes horribly wrong. Cadence has an accident and now, at seventeen, she’s still suffering from constant migraines and selective amnesia. She doesn’t remember a thing of what happened. But after having skipped summer sixteen to travel Europe with her dad, Cadence finally returns to Beechwood Island, desperate for answers.

We Were Liars was absolutely brilliant. The idea of a perfect and rich family with their own island is fascinating, and E. Lockhart pulled it off impeccably AND realistically. The flashbacks, Cadence’s pain written in fanciful poetry, and yes, even the romance, was enjoyable to read. It beautifully conveyed the reality that no family is perfect, and there is an overall message in the book about dealing with family problems, money, expectations, pain, loss, and guilt…

And then there’s the plot twist. OH BOY, what can I say about the plot twist? My heart skipped a beat and I had to read the page again and again when I got to it. And the best part: it was entirely believable. (I mean, it took some time but I eventually came to terms with it.) Seriously, the plot twist is amazing.

The book isn’t perfect. (Duh, nothing’s perfect. Not even the Sinclairs!) The switching timelines were confusing: I didn’t know half the time when Cadence was talking about summer fifteen or seventeen. It could have been improved with chapter headings or something like ‘before’ and ‘after’. Cadence is okay as a character– not enough personality in my opinion, and not very likable, either. There were also some overdone metaphors that cut the quality of the writing, and and abrupt ending that needed more and slower falling action.

But please, don’t let my harsh criticism put you off. (that’s just me being me, really.) We Were Liars gripped me from the start and I finished the book in hours. I sacrificed sleep for it, and I don’t regret a thing. It’s the best of the best of contemporary suspense novels and I can’t wait to read it again. 9.5/10.

Teen SRC 2019 – They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera

They Both Die at the End

When I first picked up They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera, I thought it would be one of those depressing books where the general suckiness of the world is discussed at length before everyone dies. (slight exaggeration, but you get the idea) I was pleasantly surprised when this book ended up being anything but.

Death-Cast is a company that calls you on the last day of your life to inform you about your impending doom, to make sure you live the last hours of your life to the fullest.

Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio get the call on the same day. Mateo’s dad is in hospital, in a coma, and he doesn’t want to tell his best (and only) friend, Lidia, that he is going to die because he’s scared of how she is going to react. Mateo knows that he needs to go outside, he needs to live his last day to the fullest, but maybe he’s destined to stay inside his apartment forever, just like he’s been doing his entire life.

Read More

Teen SRC 2019- The Hidden Memory Of Objects by Danielle Mages Amato

The Hidden Memory of Objects

The Hidden Memory of Objects by Danielle Mages Amato is a book that encompasses loss, grief, friendship, and learning to heal in a beautiful story that will leave readers speechless and wanting for more.

Megan Brown’s brother, Tyler died, but no one understands how — or why. When the police tell her that he died from a drug overdose, and potentially a suicide, Megan is crushed. The brother she had known and loved — was it possible that she didn’t know him at all?

Heartbroken, she starts sifting through his old things, hoping to find some answers. But when she stumbles upon an old cigar box, one that was found on Tyler’s body after his death, intense pain fills her head at its touch. Confused, Megan starts touching other belongings of Tyler’s and realizes that when she touches some objects, she has visions of what happened in the past to the owners of the objects. Desperate for answers, she teams up with an charming friend of Tyler’s, and an old friend of her own to find out what happened that fateful day.

Read More