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Teen SRC 2019 – They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera

They Both Die at the End

When I first picked up They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera, I thought it would be one of those depressing books where the general suckiness of the world is discussed at length before everyone dies. (slight exaggeration, but you get the idea) I was pleasantly surprised when this book ended up being anything but.

Death-Cast is a company that calls you on the last day of your life to inform you about your impending doom, to make sure you live the last hours of your life to the fullest.

Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio get the call on the same day. Mateo’s dad is in hospital, in a coma, and he doesn’t want to tell his best (and only) friend, Lidia, that he is going to die because he’s scared of how she is going to react. Mateo knows that he needs to go outside, he needs to live his last day to the fullest, but maybe he’s destined to stay inside his apartment forever, just like he’s been doing his entire life.

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Teen SRC 2019 – Algorithms to Live By by Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths

Algorithms to Live By by Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths

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Algorithms to Live By is a fascinating nonfiction read. As the title goes, authors Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths explore a selection of famous algorithms and procedures from computer science and apply them to aspects of our everyday lives. These aspects range from things such as scheduling your day, to knowing how long to search through a list for a best choice (which happens to be after you’ve gone through precisely 37% of the options).

As someone quite involved in computer science, this book was both familiar and new to me at the same time. The familiar nature of the book came from some of the algorithms the authors mentioned, which I had previously explored in academic studies and personal learning. However, one doesn’t need to have already known the computational concepts present to understand the book as the authors go over them in detail. What was new for me was their application, which provided a new perspective on computer science. Most of my computer programs are utilities, less concerned with being concepts that I could follow outside the field. Reading this book has shown me that computer science has much greater applications and usefulness to the world, not just in coding helpful applications but also being a guide for making better decisions in life.

I recommend this book to anyone looking to explore this new perspective, as well as to anyone interested in aspects of computer science.

Teen SRC 2019- the perks of being a wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

Hey! This is my first teen SRC review I’ve ever done so I wanted to dedicate it to a book that meant a lot to me. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

I first read this book when I was around the age of 10 and to be honest, I had no idea what was going on half of the time. I actually thought this book was pretty pointless. A few years later, I saw it at the local library and I thought I’d give it another try, given the fact that I was literally 10 when I first read it. I started reading through it, when it hit me how dumb I was as a child. I saw Charlie’s writing through a whole different perspective and it amazed me how much I related to his thoughts. I felt as if Charlie and I were somehow reaching out to each other. Charlie and I shared a fascinating connection of poetry and reading. As I flipped through the pages in this book, I felt myself get more and more attached to Charlie. It blew my mind knowing that I could connect with a character in such a way.

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