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Teen SRC 2021 – The Wishing Spell by Chris Colfer

The Land of Stories: The Wishing Spell by Chris Colfer | Little, Brown Books  for Young Readers

The Wishing Spell by Chris Colfer in the Land of Stories series is addictive and astonishing. Furthermore, the novel is fast-pacing and keeps the audience at the edge of their seats. The author would use detail and sensories to drive the reader to experience the events and empathize with the characters’ emotions. Each chapter is dynamic and becomes more and more intense at the end. The genres are fantasy, adventure and suitable for teens. I would highly recommend the novel to teenagers because you can recollect the fairy tales and the memories while also getting engaged at a comfortable reading level. The main characters Alex and Conner, get swallowed into a magical book, then end up in the fairy tale world. The main characters have a chance to interact face-to-face with the characters that filled their lively childhood but met antagonists such as wolves, witches and trolls. However, escaping is difficult which so the twins went through an unpredictable and magical journey. In summary, I would rate The Wishing Spell nine out of ten because it’s addicting and astonishing!

Teen SRC 2021 – Click’d by Tamara Ireland Stone

Click’d, a book by Tamara Ireland Stone, is about a game that Allie Navarro made at her CodeGirls camp that helps you make friends. She is really excited to share it with everyone at her school. As Allie works on her game harder than ever, it suddenly makes a huge mistake. Click’d sends out a really embarrassing photo that was never meant to be sent. Allie tries desperately to fix her game, and as she does, there is triumph and sadness, victory and failure. Then more and more embarrassing pictures are sent out, and Allie might have to drop out of Games for Good, a really big competition for coders. Click’d is a book about drama, friendship, accepting failure, and learning from it.

I liked this book because it had some very real-life moments in it, that have even happened to me and my friends. I feel like this book is really good for people who love the drama genre, or who are just looking for an interesting book. Click’d was very well-written, and fun to read.

Teen SRC 2021 – Anne of Green Gables by L.M Montgomery

In this book you will meet a freckled, redheaded girl named Anne Shirley (Anne spelt with an e, for Anne without the e is much less romantic). Anne has a clever imagination which she uses daily, and you will find yourself imagining along with her. As she grows up, she makes many mistakes and many friends, and even a bosom friend, Diana. This classic book is well-written and will surely make you smile and cry right beside Anne. There are many twists and turns to this book, happy and sad, and it is a great book for people who enjoy long hours of reading. I highly recommend reading Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery.

Teen Book Review – The Unwanteds by Lisa McMann

The Unwanteds

In Lisa McMann‘s fascinating fantasy series, The Unwanteds, twins Aaron and Alexander Stowe are forced to be separated, in a land of unfair and unjust rules. In the land of Quill, children are separated into Wanteds, Unwanteds or Necessaries. While being an artistic is a death sentence, Aaron is treated like royalty as a Wanted and sent to university. I absolutely love Lisa’s stories because the detail and creativeness that goes into her stories is incredible. A fantasy series filled with magic, art, and wonder is just my cup of tea. With magic and creativity, Alex and his friends bring the stories to life with their special talents and unique ideas. If you love magic and fantasy, I definitely recommend this spectacular series.

Teen SRC 2020 – The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (2nd Book in the Narnia Series) by C. S. Lewis

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe - Lewis, C. S.

The real world is boring; it’s dull, unimaginative and uninventive, so we create fantasies as a way to escape into a magical, different, unique world. We watch movies or plays to experience something more interesting than the harsh realities of everyday life, so we dream. Authors like C.S Lewis and J.K Rowling show us this gloomy world, and then beneath everything they give us something extraordinary. In The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis, four rather ordinary children, Peter, Susan, Edmond, and Lucy are about to take an exceptional adventure. When they come across a wardrobe, there is a path into a more interesting realm, in which they experience something spectacular.

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Teen SRC 2020 – Prince Caspian (4th book of the Narnia Series)

Prince Caspian - Lewis, C. S.

Prince Caspian by C.S Lewis has the Pevensie siblings spending a whole year dreaming about returning to Narnia. However, when they finally get pulled back into Narnia, they realize a very important thing, “Things never happen the same way twice.” They then discover time passes differently in Narnia, and that thousands of years had already passed and everyone they knew has passed on. Narnia has been corrupted by a cruel, cold blooded leader who killed his way to his spot, and now the children have to gather up the talking animal’s courage in order to fight back against the tyrant and have circumstances return to a peaceful state.

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Teen SRC 2020 – The Miserable Mill (the 4th book in the Unfortunate Event Series) by Lewis Snicket

The Miserable Mill by Lemony Snicket

The Miserable Mill by Lewis Snicket has the children heading to Paltryville where they hope to uncover more of their parents’ past. They arrive at the Lucky Smells Lumbermill where they meet “Sir”, the owner of the mill and his pushover partner “Charles”. They make a deal with Sir and agree to work at the Lumbermill until Violet comes of age.

“The deal is this: I will try to make sure that Count Olaf and his associates never go anywhere near you, and you will work in my lumbermill until you come of age and get all that money. Is that a fair deal?” -Sir

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Teen SRC 2020 – The Reptile Room by Lemony Snicket

The Reptile Room - Snicket, Lemony

The Reptile Room by Lemony Snicket

Uncle Monty appears like a kind-hearted and secure person. The Baudelaires like him and it feels like they have finally found their perfect caretaker. They each have their own room and their own duties for the trip they’ll be taking. They’re very eager for the experience and everything seemed to have clicked together. Until Stephano, Uncle Monty’s “assistant”, who is really Count Olaf in disguise, appears in the picture. Everything falls apart as the children desperately tries to persuade the others that Count Olaf is up to mischief once more. But no one even looks twice before dismissing them. Once again the children are left on their own to survive.

It feels that every time they’re given a slight crack at a new life, it’s snatched from them. The relationship between the siblings is exceptionally strong and their strengths really compliment each other. They make an extraordinary team & they each pull their weight when needed. The story shows how sometimes adults dismisses children as a reliable source. But many times because they don’t notice them, children often hear the most I rate this 7/10 as I still really enjoyed it however, why is the only adult helping the Baudelaires an incompetent banker? Shouldn’t there be other RESPONSIBLE adults involved in the process before giving the children to the next caretaker?

Teen SRC 2020 – The Wide Window by Lemony Snicket

The Wide Window

The Wide Window by Lemony Snicket

The children have managed to escape being captured by Count Olaf yet again and now they are at their new guardian, Aunt Josephine. She lost her husband and now lives alone at the top of a cliff, in a house that is right above Lake Lachrymose. However, she worries about everything that might possibly happen, and completely obsessed about grammar. The circumstances there are quite boring but the peace is quickly broken when Violet runs into “Captain Sham”. The children immediately recognizes the man as Count Olaf Right away. However, no one believes them that Count Olaf is back to his old schemes. Therefore, the children are on their own again.

By the third book of this series the formula is already really obvious. Mr Poe pushes the kids to another rookie relative, Count Olaf turns up in a disguise and the children recognizes him automatically. All the adults just dismisses them and their accusations. Count Olaf almost captures the children. They then use each of their own skills (Inventor, book worm, and biter), the children forestall Count Olaf and the follower chosen . Mr Poe coughs, calls the police, and lets Olaf escape; and repeat. Because the pattern is obvious and annoying I am enjoying the series less and less, I would rate this book 6/10. At the start it was interesting and intriguing, but now its really irritating.

Teen SRC 2020 – The Horse and His Boy by C. S. Lewis

The Horse and His Boy - Lewis, C. S.

The Horse and His Boy by C. S. Lewis

It takes place during the Golden Age of Narnia, with the Pevensies ruling at their peak. The two main characters and horses are escaping from Calormen and travelling north of Narnia. On their travel, they learn of the Prince of Calormen’s plan to overtake Archenland. They then have to race the Calormen to Archenland in order to warn the King of Archenland of the incoming attack.

Although the story is set in the countries to the south of Narnia (Calormen and Archenland), which gives it a quite different experience then the previous books. I always find the visual imagery and the feelings of each character as they evolve fascinating. But he revived his deceitful, dirty, turban-clad race, the Calormen. A lost fair skinned boy grew up among them and he is depressed until he is finally reunited with the beautiful, white, and kind people of Narnia. His representation of the people of Calormen is dreadful . When he says “Calor-men”, by calor is he implying people of the hot countries or is it the not inconspicuous way of indicating colored people? However, the descriptions reveals it all; the people are described as dark skin, wears turbans, and savage slave owners. Their leader is a dishonest war-dealer. This land and its people are consistently compared against the fair-skinned, wise and free-thinking people of Narnia and Archenland. However, all of this could be seen from another point of view. Lewis may have been trying to describe the life as it was years ago in that area. There were slavery in those communities too as it was in the western world, and there were child marriages in their society. Besides that, the story came off strongly and all the scenes and visuals are really detailed. I still really enjoyed the story and how it was different from the first two and I rate it 8/10.